What Others Have to Say

If you’re a parent of a child who is struggling in school, doesn’t seem to learn like his/her peers, is struggling to read on grade level or at all, then you have found the right teacher. Erin Paske has rescued us from the abyss of dyslexia. Sometimes just trying to figure out why they are struggling is the biggest hurdle. Once identified, parents often don’t know where to turn. They feel helpless to give their child what they need, and often the school can only do so much. Some disorders, like dyslexia, are not recognized as learning disabilities in certain states, and therefore are not tested for and not treated in the school setting.

Erin utilizes the Barton System, which is a nationally recognized dyslexia program. The Barton System is very systematic and teaches the child to memorize rules that help them decipher words. Words that seem impossible to read are suddenly easy, once you know the rules. Our son is amazed at how well he can read now!

Erin made learning fun with games, play dough words, songs, and customizes the learning to our child. She gave him choices and the breaks that he needed, but maintained discipline to get the work done. Erin was prompt, reliable, accountable, and flexible to our schedule. All around, she was the best tutor we have ever had and really understood our dyslexic and autistic son and how he learned. What a blessing she was to our son!

–Allyson P.,Thompson’s Station, TN


We are so thankful to have found Erin Paske at the Nashville Dyslexia Center.  Our son was definitely behind most of his peers in kindergarten.  He has worked through the Barton Reading & Spelling System with Erin all summer.  We have seen significant gains in his reading. We are confident he will be ready for first grade.  The Nashville Dyslexia Center has been the best place for our son!

—Chandler C., Franklin, TN


As a journalism professor for 23 years, I found it heartbreaking to encounter students who were passionate about reporting, had high ethical standards and natural story-telling instincts, yet struggled with reading and writing.

I remember one student in particular. While discussing his poor grades in my office, he admitted he “disliked” reading. Disliked reading? No wonder he didn’t write well. “The more you read, the better you write” was my classroom mantra. I didn’t realize way back then that he may have been struggling with dyslexia. Wanting him to persevere, I suggested he go to the Writing Center, open to all students on campus and tutored by English majors. The sad thing is that there was no Reading Center and he eventually dropped out. His “road to success” had been riddled with bumps and obstacles; he didn’t see any alternative but to abandon his dream.

How many other college students have been, are, and will be cheated out of their future to do what they love because of undiagnosed reading and writing difficulties? Although college is not too late to unlock dyslexia, the earlier a child receives attention, the better.

I wish my student had the opportunity to learn at the Nashville Dyslexia Center.

Erin Paske, my nephew’s wife, has exceptional educational credentials and experience to smooth the path of learning for students who “dislike” reading. I’m impressed with her continual quest to stay abreast on research and tutoring methods for dyslexia. I see the sparkle in her eyes when she describes the latest breakthrough in a student’s progress or discovers a new, evidence-based approach. I highly recommend NDC, not only because it guides children toward success, but perhaps more importantly, it inspires hope in them to realize their dreams.

—Journalism Professor Emeritus of University of Wisconsin – River Falls, Colleen Callahan